Posted in Autistic Identity, Catholic education, Catholic leadership, higher education, Identity, writing

Goodbye, Academia (Again)

[Image: A brick wall has been broken down and the foreground has some debris that’s difficult to make out. There is a large, green coniferous tree standing directly in front of the opening. It is sunny outside. A mist hides some of what is beyond, but the world outside seems welcoming.]
If you follow me regularly, you’ll know that I’ve recently been conflicted about whether to focus my non-school related energy on pursuing an Ed.D. or focusing on my writing.  You may also remember, I’ve got all the Ph.D. courses necessary for a Ph.D. in Education or Library and Information Science, but I left the path to the ivory tower because of a lack of support.

The little voice in me finally started to speak; actually, she screamed during this #BoycottToSiri saga that’s been going on lately.

The little voice that is me had already been complaining considerably while I was writing my paper to end the semester.  I knocked the thing out pretty quickly and it’s fine; it answered my questions, and I did okay.  But I hated every minute of writing that academic paper.

Here’s what I learned about myself.

Continue reading “Goodbye, Academia (Again)”

Posted in Advocacy, Catholic education, Catholic leadership, leadership, Parenting, School governance, School Leadership, Teaching

Focusing on Forever: the Difficulty of Catholic School Administration in a Here-and-Now World

As a school principal and a parent, I get a few things about education in a way that other parents and principals might not.

First, I get that school is a “right” in a theoretical sense.

But I also get that administrators have to balance rights against each other.  In other words, they have to make school safe for the majority with the limited budgets they have.

It was that understanding of reality that made me decide to homeschool our Autistic son.  There is no way I can expect him to be in a group of other chatty people and have him have any sense of happiness.  Perhaps if we had found my school with me as leader when he was younger (as in, pre-kindergarten in his case; his school damage was gigantic), it might have been different.  We didn’t, and he doesn’t even like the idea of going back to school, so he won’t at this time.  I figure, that’s okay, we’ll make it work.

But we have enough privilege to be able to have jobs that involve working at home.  I used to score standardized tests at home, and my husband does testing for an Autistic-friendly company.

Not everyone has that, which is why I’m glad to have my school.

As a Catholic school principal, I am not merely charged with getting kids ready for college.  I am, however, charged with getting them ready for college, work, to be a mom, dad, religious sister or brother, priest, etc. as well as getting them ready for heaven.

We take the long path.  We are focused on much, much more than grades and college-preparation. It is a slow, winding journey with many missteps.  We sin, we fall, but we confess and we learn and we do better the next time.

It is not as easy as preparing kids for college.  There is so much more at stake in a Catholic school.

My kids know this and are good at forgiving each other for mistakes of all kinds.  At least, they normally do.  Long-term parents, also, know, that little dust-ups shall pass, and they move on pretty fast because they know the kids love each other and this is a safe place.

However, sometimes parents can be a bigger issue than the kids.

I had an issue this week with a parent who was upset because a student struck her child.  He was uninjured.  He hit back.  She was uninjured.

Here’s what happened, and how the parent over-reacted because she was too busy advocating for her own child at the expense of other children.

Don’t be this parent.

Continue reading “Focusing on Forever: the Difficulty of Catholic School Administration in a Here-and-Now World”

Posted in Catholic leadership, Self-Care

Preventing Overload or Not: The Guilt of Being an Autistic Leader

Just a quick note to say since our school reduced numbers, it has been quieter and the classroom that the family was in is now much more peaceful.   We did the right thing.

Meanwhile, it is hotter than average and I’ve had longer days again than usual, with extra meetings.  I’m getting over a bad cold (which was at least relatively quick in passing).  My pre-arthritis (I can’t bear to call it arthritis yet…) is twingy.  I can feel myself heading for overload.

Continue reading “Preventing Overload or Not: The Guilt of Being an Autistic Leader”

Posted in Autistic Identity, Catholic leadership, leadership

Truth and the Renegade Leader

One of the things about being Catholic is that we are called to believe in one Truth (capital T) which is Jesus/God/Holy Spirit…you know, TRUTH.  And this actually fits in line with what I think the Autistic view of Truth is…the idea that there is one factual truth in all things.

But we also, as Autistics, believe in multiple perspectives.  As in, one person’s experiences will affect the way he or she tells the story.  Sometimes Autistics who have not been “woke” to this truth still fight it and believe only one view of events can possibly exist, but increasingly, as one becomes an activist, one learns about perspective, white privilege and so on.

In leadership, there is another kind of truth, I think.

Continue reading “Truth and the Renegade Leader”

Posted in Autistic Identity, Catholic leadership, leadership

Being Myself: Autistic leadership in a Catholic environment

Sorry for the lack of update.  It’s a busy time of year for work.  Without revealing too much, I am a Catholic school principal and we are reinventing ourselves to be more inclusive and also more authentically Catholic.  We pray more, we love more, you know…the kind of school that, if you went religious, you’d want for your Neurodiverse kid because our goal is to help kids to find their true selves and be able to advocate for themselves wherever they go to school next.  The need is great where we are.  But yes, very busy this time of year.

I just had some news that frustrates me to no end.  The teacher I thought I could depend upon to stick with me this year has been wooed away by the public schools.  They can offer him the little things like pay commensurate with experience and, well, health insurance.  I’ve done the math on what I could make, going public, and it’s more than double than what I make now.  Unfortunately, I am Autistic, and I cannot play the “fitting in” games required in public schools.  I just don’t have the spoons for it.

Continue reading “Being Myself: Autistic leadership in a Catholic environment”