Gossip

The priest across town who, at various intervals seemed to support me or at least seemed to NOT unsupport me, has been ousted.

The congregation never “took to him.” He does have a tendency to use allusions the working class can’t follow and he doesn’t always lay a clear transitional path in his homilies.  Actually, he also has this tendency to never change register and talks to kids with the same, unfiltered version of what the Catholic church teaches that he does to adults.  The little kids actually like him a lot; the big kids, who have been socialized to learn you don’t hurt feelings with the truth, are suspicious of him.  It doesn’t help he followed a very loved priest, who died unexpectedly who really only seemed to focus on eldercare and, in our experience when we were there, our son was summarily thrown out of the school because of his Autism, because the late priest neglected the school.

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Posted in Advocacy

neurotypicals Are Very Odd Creatures: Watching Survivor to Analyze Neurotypicality

So, a long time ago, when the television show Survivor first came out, I watched it and was utterly fascinated.  The main thing I loved about it was watching Richard Hatch play a game no one else yet understood was the actual game of the show and (spoiler alert) be rewarded with a million dollars.

[A blue piranha with red stomach is hidden in some underwater grass. Jeff Probst, the host of Survivor, pointed out that a bigger fish can take your finger off with one bite. Image from Pixabay]
If you don’t know the game, the gist is they strand people on an island in two groups and early on, the way you get power is by winning challenges, many of which are physical, which can be a real problem due to (as the show goes on) less and less food being available to you unless you’re good at finding it on your own.  There are mental challenges, too, but these get hard given the lack of food as well.  The trick is to figure out how to stay healthy physically so you can compete physically and mentally.  When there are too few people to have two separate groups, they merge them together and the challenges become individual.  If you get “immunity,” the others can’t get rid of you by voting you out, but almost all of the people who are there after the merge then become a jury who decide who wins the million at the end, so if you’re too devious in your scheming, it will cost you.  Maybe.

Anyway, when the game first started, the original group had literally no idea what the game was, so it was relatively easy for Hatch to create a core alliance and use it to have an effective voting bloc to ensure that what he thought, strategically, would be the best thing to do, he was able to actually carry out.

Fast-forward to the season I just finished, season 6 (I only really watched the first, some of the celebrity edition, and the all-star season, so I’m watching old ones).  I was incensed this season, more than before, and it made me think about the “pretty people” vs. the rest of us and what all this means for society.

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